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Regular version of the site
Book
Regulatory policy in Russia: key trends and architecture of the future

Golodnikova A., Yefremov A., Sobol D. et al.

M.: Center for Strategic Research, 2018.

Article
Object of taxation under digitalization

Lyutova O. I.

Вестник Российского университета дружбы народов. Серия: Юридические науки. 2020. Vol. 24. No. 3. P. 695-716.

Book chapter
Use of the Internet of Things in Public Governance for Law Enforcement and Inspection: The Case of Russia

Knutov A., Styrin E. M.

In bk.: Beyond Smart and Connected Governments Sensors and the Internet of Things in the Public Sector. Springer, 2020. Ch. 7. P. 139-164.

Working paper
Public Service Motivation And Sectoral Employment In Russia: New Perspectives On The Attraction Vs. Socialization Debate

Gans-Morse J., Kalgin A., Klimenko A. et al.

Public and Social Policy. WP BRP Series. НИУ ВШЭ, 2020

Russian law-making needs both a regulatory axe to wield and experimentation

Governments have eventually come to realise, that they can no longer take for granted the designs of a growing number of industry regulators. The need had arisen to organise a systematic analysis of the laws and regulations before they come into force. The most well-known mechanism that has become established almost universally, including Russia itself in recent years, is regulatory impact analysis (assessment). In an interview for the "Russia of the Future: 2017 → 2035" project, Director of the Regulatory Impact Assessment Centre of IPAM NRU HSE Daniil Tsygankov talks about the features and implementation of RIA.

Russian law-making needs both a regulatory axe to wield and experimentation

Interview (Ru)